590 Notes

theonion:

Woman Not Going To Let Husband Of 60 Years Drag Her Into Death At Same Time

Unlike these folks:
Bob and Barbara Pettis
Marie and William DeCaro
Helen and Kenny Felumlee
Victoria and Steven Wrubel
Jerome and Diane Pawlak

366 Notes

Obit of the Day: The Royal Milliner

For more than thirty years Philip Somerville served as the milliner to Queen Elizabeth II, a busy job since Her Royal Highness was never spotted without something atop her head. Mr. Somerville made approximately 50 hats a year for the Queen.

Born in England, Mr. Somerville did not began his work with hats until his early 20s after trying his hand in the Merchant Marines and as an actor in Australia. In the late 1960s he returned to England ostensibly to work for the Star Hat company which had sent him abroad, but instead he was hired away by Otto Lucas, a designer of couture headwear.

Working on his own after Mr. Lucas’ death, Mr. Somerville was invited to design hats for Queen Elizabeth beginning in the 1980s. (No specific year was listed in the sources.) Not long after, her daughter-in-law Princess Diana also requested her own line of Somerville-designed chapeaus.

He credited Diana with returning the hat to some level of prominence in British society as young people became attracted to her choices of headwear.

Mr. Somerville’s designs were eventually seen on the heads of upperclass women across England. He even designed the headwear wore by Xenia (Famke Janssen) in the Bond film Goldeneye and Elektra King (Sophie Marceau) in The World is Not Enough.

Nearing the end of his career, Mr. Somerville designed a black and white, broad-brimmed feathered cap for Kate Middleton in June 2008. She wore it to Prince William’s induction into the Order of the Garter. The hat was later sold at auction in 2012 for £3,222, more than 10 times its original price.

Philip Somerville, who retired in 2008, passed away at age 84 on September 14, 2014.

Sources: The Telegraph and The Daily Mail

Images:

Top - Queen Elizabeth II wearing a Philip Somerville straw hat to the Buckingham Palace Garden Party, June 2014, courtesy of royalhats.wordpress.com and copyright of the Associated Press

Center - Princess Diana wearing a turban hat during a visit to Dubai in 1989. The hat was specifically designed to keep her hair concealed in a small attempt to honor the dress code of the United Arab Emirates. The photo is courtesy of Socialite Life.

Bottom - Kate Middleton wearing the above mentioned Somerville creation to the 2008 Order of the Garter ceremony. Courtesy of hellomagazine.com

Also relevant on Obit of the Day:

Murray Arbeid - Dress designer for Princess Diana

Raymond Hudd - American couture milliner

Lady Pulbrook - Royal florist

33 Notes

Can we be the ‘of the day’ family?

My 9-year-old son after learning that my wife has started momkuoftheday

I imagine difficult arguments between my son and his progeny, “Listen, we are an ‘oftheday’ family! My tumblr has ‘oftheday’ as did your grandmother’s and your grandfather’s. And so help me, SO WILL YOURS!”

Or maybe it ends up as a cool Tumblr Tuesday.

281 Notes

Obit of the Day: “Fragrant Orchid”
Yoshiko Yamaguchi straddled two cultures throughout her life, and it nearly cost her everything. Born to Japanese parents who were living in Manchuria, a region of China occupied by Japan, Ms. Yamaguchi would be used as a political pawn on the silver screen.
Fluent in both Mandarin and Japanese, Ms. Yamaguchi used that rare talent to become one of the top cinema stars of Japan in the 1930s and 1940s. She was passed off to audiences as a Chinese national based on her ability with the language and her stage name, Li Xianglan (meaning “fragrant orchid” a name given to her as a teenager by a Chinese general who was considered her godfather). Li Xianglan, which was pronounced as Ri Koran in Japanese, often portrayed Chinese women who fell in love with Japanese heroes. The films were presenting, on film, an alliance between the two countries that did not exist. 
She starred in seventeen films before and during World War II, at the height of the Japanese Empire. And although popular in Japan her performances were poorly received in the rest of Asia, not for her ability but for the message.
After the surrender of Japan, Ms. Yamaguchi was charged with treason against China. It took a birth certificate, smuggled into Shanghai by a Russian friend, to save her from the firing squad. She was still forced to leave the country by a Chinese judge.
She returned to Japan and continued to star in films, including Scandal (1950), directed by Akira Kurosawa and co-starring Toshiro Mifune. 
She moved to Hollywood a few years later and and performed as Shirley Yamaguchi, in honor of Shirley Temple. During her short stay she made appearances on several television shows and in a few films. She was also the star of a Broadway show, Shangri-La.
Returning to Japan she eventually entered politics and was elected to the Japanese parliament in 1974. She served for seventeen years.
Yoshiko Yamaguchi, who had her life story presented in the 1991 Japanese musical Rikoran, died on September 7, 2014. She was 94.
Sources: Washington Post, Wikipedia, IMDB
(Image of Yoshiko Yamaguchi, at the age of 13 or 14, when she was given the nickname Li Xianglan, “fragrant orchid,” by her godfather. It is courtesy of wikimedia.org)
Also relevant on Obit of the Day:
Shirley Temple

Obit of the Day: “Fragrant Orchid”

Yoshiko Yamaguchi straddled two cultures throughout her life, and it nearly cost her everything. Born to Japanese parents who were living in Manchuria, a region of China occupied by Japan, Ms. Yamaguchi would be used as a political pawn on the silver screen.

Fluent in both Mandarin and Japanese, Ms. Yamaguchi used that rare talent to become one of the top cinema stars of Japan in the 1930s and 1940s. She was passed off to audiences as a Chinese national based on her ability with the language and her stage name, Li Xianglan (meaning “fragrant orchid” a name given to her as a teenager by a Chinese general who was considered her godfather). Li Xianglan, which was pronounced as Ri Koran in Japanese, often portrayed Chinese women who fell in love with Japanese heroes. The films were presenting, on film, an alliance between the two countries that did not exist. 

She starred in seventeen films before and during World War II, at the height of the Japanese Empire. And although popular in Japan her performances were poorly received in the rest of Asia, not for her ability but for the message.

After the surrender of Japan, Ms. Yamaguchi was charged with treason against China. It took a birth certificate, smuggled into Shanghai by a Russian friend, to save her from the firing squad. She was still forced to leave the country by a Chinese judge.

She returned to Japan and continued to star in films, including Scandal (1950), directed by Akira Kurosawa and co-starring Toshiro Mifune. 

She moved to Hollywood a few years later and and performed as Shirley Yamaguchi, in honor of Shirley Temple. During her short stay she made appearances on several television shows and in a few films. She was also the star of a Broadway show, Shangri-La.

Returning to Japan she eventually entered politics and was elected to the Japanese parliament in 1974. She served for seventeen years.

Yoshiko Yamaguchi, who had her life story presented in the 1991 Japanese musical Rikoran, died on September 7, 2014. She was 94.

Sources: Washington Post, Wikipedia, IMDB

(Image of Yoshiko Yamaguchi, at the age of 13 or 14, when she was given the nickname Li Xianglan, “fragrant orchid,” by her godfather. It is courtesy of wikimedia.org)

Also relevant on Obit of the Day:

Shirley Temple