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The Departed: Extinction in America

Obit of the Day: Podcast Recommendation

It took a while to find an episode that directly connected to this blog but finally backstoryradio addressed extinction, which is close enough for me. 

Highly recommend the show featuring “The American History Guys” who cover various topics in U.S. history from the perspectives of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

You can subscribe on iTunes or listen through Soundcloud (which is obviously the link source). And they have a tumblr

1184 Notes

It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate, who passed away on April 17, 2014 at the age of 87.

Here is his NY TImes obituary,

38 Notes

Obit of the Day (Historical): Kateri Tekakwitha (1680)
On October 21, 2012, Kateri Tekakwitha was canonized, becoming the first Native American to be so honored by the Catholic Church. A member of the Mohawk tribe, she was orphaned when she was four after a smallpox epidemic wiped out her family.
Raised by an aunt and uncle, Kateri* discovered Catholicism after Jesuit missionaries from France were forcibly placed among the Mohawks as part of a treaty folllowing the defeat of the natives by the French. She converted when she was 20 years old, and many in her tribe shunned her, claiming she was a witch.
Catherine became rather aggressive in her theology known especially for her corporal mortification, which today we would recognize as self-abuse. She would walk for miles in the snow without shoes. She bloodied her back by whipping herself over 1000 times at a sitting. It was even claimed that she slept on a bed of thorns. She also made a vow of purity remaining a virgin for her life earning her the nickname, “Lily of the Mohawks.”
After her death at the age of 24, on April 17, 1680, it was written that her smallpox scars were miraculously healed and her face became white. (I could not determine whether sources meant her face glowed or it was a comment on race.) After her death she was reportedly seen by three witnesses over a period of weeks. Her mentor, Father Claude Chauchetière built a chapel near her grave which became a site for pilgrims in the late 17th century.
Beginning in 1884, U.S. Catholic bishops asked for her canonizaton but it was not until 1980 that Pope John Paul II beatified her putting her on the path to sainthood.
In 2006, Kateri’s name was invoked in the healing of a young boy from Washington state who was suffering from a flesh-eating bacteria. The five-year-old was near death having received the Catholic sacrament of Last Rites and his parents making plans to donate his organs. Desperate, his father asked friends and neighbors to pray for his son in the name of Kateri and the boy’s mother laid one her bones at his bedside. The boy recovered.
Pope Benedict XVI raised Kateri to sainthood two years later making her the first Native American to earn that status. Her sainthood caused some controversy among the Mohawk people who, although proud of her recognition, also saw her sainthood as a painful reminder of the forced conversions and harsh treatment that their ancestors suffered under Catholic missionaries.
St. Kateri Tekakwitha’s feast day is July 14 and she is the patron saint of ecology and the environment, alongside St. Francis of Assisi.
Sources: Wikipedia, Catholic.org, and NBC News
(Painting of St. Kateri Tekakwitha done by Father Chauchetière is the only known image of the saint from life. Although she died in 1680, the priest painted it in 1690. Courtesy of wikimedia.org.)
* St. Kateri’s birthname is unknown. She took “Catherine” as her baptismal name. She was not called “Kateri” until 1891 when Ellen Hardin Walworth decided that the name sounded more Mohawk. 

Obit of the Day (Historical): Kateri Tekakwitha (1680)

On October 21, 2012, Kateri Tekakwitha was canonized, becoming the first Native American to be so honored by the Catholic Church. A member of the Mohawk tribe, she was orphaned when she was four after a smallpox epidemic wiped out her family.

Raised by an aunt and uncle, Kateri* discovered Catholicism after Jesuit missionaries from France were forcibly placed among the Mohawks as part of a treaty folllowing the defeat of the natives by the French. She converted when she was 20 years old, and many in her tribe shunned her, claiming she was a witch.

Catherine became rather aggressive in her theology known especially for her corporal mortification, which today we would recognize as self-abuse. She would walk for miles in the snow without shoes. She bloodied her back by whipping herself over 1000 times at a sitting. It was even claimed that she slept on a bed of thorns. She also made a vow of purity remaining a virgin for her life earning her the nickname, “Lily of the Mohawks.”

After her death at the age of 24, on April 17, 1680, it was written that her smallpox scars were miraculously healed and her face became white. (I could not determine whether sources meant her face glowed or it was a comment on race.) After her death she was reportedly seen by three witnesses over a period of weeks. Her mentor, Father Claude Chauchetière built a chapel near her grave which became a site for pilgrims in the late 17th century.

Beginning in 1884, U.S. Catholic bishops asked for her canonizaton but it was not until 1980 that Pope John Paul II beatified her putting her on the path to sainthood.

In 2006, Kateri’s name was invoked in the healing of a young boy from Washington state who was suffering from a flesh-eating bacteria. The five-year-old was near death having received the Catholic sacrament of Last Rites and his parents making plans to donate his organs. Desperate, his father asked friends and neighbors to pray for his son in the name of Kateri and the boy’s mother laid one her bones at his bedside. The boy recovered.

Pope Benedict XVI raised Kateri to sainthood two years later making her the first Native American to earn that status. Her sainthood caused some controversy among the Mohawk people who, although proud of her recognition, also saw her sainthood as a painful reminder of the forced conversions and harsh treatment that their ancestors suffered under Catholic missionaries.

St. Kateri Tekakwitha’s feast day is July 14 and she is the patron saint of ecology and the environment, alongside St. Francis of Assisi.

Sources: Wikipedia, Catholic.org, and NBC News

(Painting of St. Kateri Tekakwitha done by Father Chauchetière is the only known image of the saint from life. Although she died in 1680, the priest painted it in 1690. Courtesy of wikimedia.org.)

* St. Kateri’s birthname is unknown. She took “Catherine” as her baptismal name. She was not called “Kateri” until 1891 when Ellen Hardin Walworth decided that the name sounded more Mohawk. 

490 Notes

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Martin Richard, age 8
Martin Richard was one of three people killed in the bombing at the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15, 2013. Martin’s sister Jane, 7, and his mother, Denise, were injured. Mrs. Richard works at Neighborhood House Charter School in the school’s library. It was also the school Martin attended.
Martin’s older brother, Henry, was not injured and neither was Martin’s father, William Richard. Mr. Richard was a runner but was not running in this year’s marathon which led to some mis-reporting that he was actually participating in the race.
Mr. Richard was a community leader in Dorchester at one time serving as president of the board of directors for the St. Mark’s Main Street Area, a civic improvement project for the city.
Here is a statement released by Mr. Martin:
“My dear son Martin has died from injuries sustained in the attack on Boston. My wife and daughter are both recovering from serious injuries. We thank our family and friends, those we know and those we have never met, for their thoughts and prayers. I ask that you continue to pray for my family as we remember Martin. We also ask for your patience and for privacy as we work to simultaneously grieve and recover. Thank you.”
(Image of Martin, apparently from his first Communion, is courtesy of WBZ-TV and via @TheMatthewKeys)
Source: Dorchester Reporter, St. Mark’s Area Main Street, AP, Neighborhood House Charter School, Yahoo, ABC7 Chicago
The other two people killed in the blast have not been named by authorities.

Posted originally one year ago there are some updates to the post:
Jane Richard, 7, lost her leg in the blast while her mother, Denise, lost her eye.
Wiliam Richard Martin ruptured both eardrums.
Henry, 11, suffered cuts and bruises but “was hurt in his heart” according to Jane.
Martin Richard was the youngest person to die that afternoon. The two other individuals killed by the two pressure cooker bombs were Krystle Marie Campbell, age 29, a restaurant manager and Lu Lingzi, age 23, a Boston University graduate student. More than 260 others were injured by the blasts.
Sean Collier, age 27, was killed later that night while on duty as an MIT police officer. He was shot several times whiel sitting his patrol car, allegedly by the Tsarnaev brothers.
Update sources: NY Daily News and Wikipedia

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Martin Richard, age 8

Martin Richard was one of three people killed in the bombing at the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15, 2013. Martin’s sister Jane, 7, and his mother, Denise, were injured. Mrs. Richard works at Neighborhood House Charter School in the school’s library. It was also the school Martin attended.

Martin’s older brother, Henry, was not injured and neither was Martin’s father, William Richard. Mr. Richard was a runner but was not running in this year’s marathon which led to some mis-reporting that he was actually participating in the race.

Mr. Richard was a community leader in Dorchester at one time serving as president of the board of directors for the St. Mark’s Main Street Area, a civic improvement project for the city.

Here is a statement released by Mr. Martin:

“My dear son Martin has died from injuries sustained in the attack on Boston. My wife and daughter are both recovering from serious injuries. We thank our family and friends, those we know and those we have never met, for their thoughts and prayers. I ask that you continue to pray for my family as we remember Martin. We also ask for your patience and for privacy as we work to simultaneously grieve and recover. Thank you.”

(Image of Martin, apparently from his first Communion, is courtesy of WBZ-TV and via @TheMatthewKeys)

Source: Dorchester Reporter, St. Mark’s Area Main Street, AP, Neighborhood House Charter School, Yahoo, ABC7 Chicago

The other two people killed in the blast have not been named by authorities.

Posted originally one year ago there are some updates to the post:

  • Jane Richard, 7, lost her leg in the blast while her mother, Denise, lost her eye.
  • Wiliam Richard Martin ruptured both eardrums.
  • Henry, 11, suffered cuts and bruises but “was hurt in his heart” according to Jane.

Martin Richard was the youngest person to die that afternoon. The two other individuals killed by the two pressure cooker bombs were Krystle Marie Campbell, age 29, a restaurant manager and Lu Lingzi, age 23, a Boston University graduate student. More than 260 others were injured by the blasts.

Sean Collier, age 27, was killed later that night while on duty as an MIT police officer. He was shot several times whiel sitting his patrol car, allegedly by the Tsarnaev brothers.

Update sources: NY Daily News and Wikipedia