26 Notes

Obit of the Day: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer

Horst Faas earned his first Pulitzer Prize in 1965 for above image. A Vietnamese man holds the body of his child while pleading with a truckload of South Vietnamese soldiers for help. The photo captured the desperation and the “collateral damage” of a war that was quickly becoming unpopular.

Faas was a German immigrant who first became a photojournalist when he joined a U.S.-run photo cooperative in his home country in 1953. He would later move over to the Associated Press. With the AP, Faas made his name in Vietnam capturing images of the war. Horst also built up a cadre of Vietnamese and other foreign photographers to help cover the war. Called “Horst’s Army” he would send them out telling to “get good pictures.”

Note: One of his protégés was Huynh Cong “Nick” Ut who would capture one of the most disturbing, and iconic, images of the war showing a screaming Vietnamese girl running down a road her clothes burned off her body by napalm.

Although Faas’ legacy is found foremost in his Vietnam coverage, he won his second Pultizer in 1972 for his work with Michael Laurent - the last journalist killed in Vietnam - capturing images of execution and torture in Bangladesh

Horst Faas, who was forced to serve in the Hitler Youth, died at the age of 79.

(The 1965 Pulitzer Prize-winning image is copyright AP/Horst Faas and courtesy of thestar.com)

Obit of the Day: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer

Horst Faas earned his first Pulitzer Prize in 1965 for above image. A Vietnamese man holds the body of his child while pleading with a truckload of South Vietnamese soldiers for help. The photo captured the desperation and the “collateral damage” of a war that was quickly becoming unpopular.

Faas was a German immigrant who first became a photojournalist when he joined a U.S.-run photo cooperative in his home country in 1953. He would later move over to the Associated Press. With the AP, Faas made his name in Vietnam capturing images of the war. Horst also built up a cadre of Vietnamese and other foreign photographers to help cover the war. Called “Horst’s Army” he would send them out telling to “get good pictures.”

Note: One of his protégés was Huynh Cong “Nick” Ut who would capture one of the most disturbing, and iconic, images of the war showing a screaming Vietnamese girl running down a road her clothes burned off her body by napalm.

Although Faas’ legacy is found foremost in his Vietnam coverage, he won his second Pultizer in 1972 for his work with Michael Laurent - the last journalist killed in Vietnam - capturing images of execution and torture in Bangladesh

Horst Faas, who was forced to serve in the Hitler Youth, died at the age of 79.

(The 1965 Pulitzer Prize-winning image is copyright AP/Horst Faas and courtesy of thestar.com)

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