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Obit of the Day: Chicago History Family Tours!
Just a reminder that when I’m not finding fascinating dead folks for this blog I am also the Family Tour Guide for the Chicago History Museum. 
And the 1st Family Trolley Tour is right around the corner:
Hot Time in the Old Town: The Great Chicago Fire
Saturday, April 27, 10:00 a.m. - Noon
Departs from the Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark St.
This tour is perfect for kids in Kindergarten and older - and entertaining for parents. (Plus I give away free Juicy Fruit. Hello!)
Tickets: $20 adults/$10 children (ONLY 20 LEFT!)
So join me on April 27 and I promise one heckuva tour of Chicago. And just for reading this post here is ONE FREE FIRE FACT:
Besides having a hot, dry summer and fall in 1871 the city of Chicago was a giant tinderbox. Not only was wood the material of choice for most 19th century buildings, but the city itself was surrounded by wooden sidewalks which were built to keep pedestrians out of the mud, and to reduce horse and carriage noise streets in some areas were paved with wooden blocks dipped in tar. 
If you do buy tickets and have Tumblr let me know when you get on the tour and you’ll receive a free enthusiastic greeting!
Image: “Mrs. O’Leary and her cow.” Photograph by Charles R. Clark, 1911, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum, (ichi-26580)

Obit of the Day: Chicago History Family Tours!

Just a reminder that when I’m not finding fascinating dead folks for this blog I am also the Family Tour Guide for the Chicago History Museum

And the 1st Family Trolley Tour is right around the corner:

Hot Time in the Old Town: The Great Chicago Fire

Saturday, April 27, 10:00 a.m. - Noon

Departs from the Chicago History Museum, 1601 N. Clark St.

This tour is perfect for kids in Kindergarten and older - and entertaining for parents. (Plus I give away free Juicy Fruit. Hello!)

Tickets: $20 adults/$10 children (ONLY 20 LEFT!)

So join me on April 27 and I promise one heckuva tour of Chicago. And just for reading this post here is ONE FREE FIRE FACT:

Besides having a hot, dry summer and fall in 1871 the city of Chicago was a giant tinderbox. Not only was wood the material of choice for most 19th century buildings, but the city itself was surrounded by wooden sidewalks which were built to keep pedestrians out of the mud, and to reduce horse and carriage noise streets in some areas were paved with wooden blocks dipped in tar. 

If you do buy tickets and have Tumblr let me know when you get on the tour and you’ll receive a free enthusiastic greeting!

Image: “Mrs. O’Leary and her cow.” Photograph by Charles R. Clark, 1911, courtesy of the Chicago History Museum, (ichi-26580)

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