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Obit of the Day: Royal Farewell

Former Royals pitcher and broadcaster, Paul Splittorff, has died of complications from melanoma. Splittorff pitched for Kansas City for fifteen seasons. Although not a great hurler, he was consistent enough to win 166 games in a decade and a half, making him the Royals all-time leader. (The Royals have not lacked for pitchers either: Mark Gubicza, David Cone, Bret Saberhagen, and Zach Greinke to name a few.) He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1987.

In 1985, he made the jump to the broadcast booth where he remained for more than a quarter century. He also received a World Series ring that year when the Royals defeated the Cardinals, which had eluded him as a player even with appearances in the ALCS in 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1980, and a loss to the Phillies in the World Series in 1980.

Splittorff was known for his direct style in the booth and had, on occassion, rubbed management the wrong way with his criticism of the team and its players. But that’s what makes a good broadcaster.

For his full stats, click here.

(Image of Splittorff’s Topps 1981 card courtesy of vintagecardprices.com. OOTD had this card and it immediately popped into his head when he heard of his illness.)

Obit of the Day: Royal Farewell

Former Royals pitcher and broadcaster, Paul Splittorff, has died of complications from melanoma. Splittorff pitched for Kansas City for fifteen seasons. Although not a great hurler, he was consistent enough to win 166 games in a decade and a half, making him the Royals all-time leader. (The Royals have not lacked for pitchers either: Mark Gubicza, David Cone, Bret Saberhagen, and Zach Greinke to name a few.) He was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 1987.

In 1985, he made the jump to the broadcast booth where he remained for more than a quarter century. He also received a World Series ring that year when the Royals defeated the Cardinals, which had eluded him as a player even with appearances in the ALCS in 1976, 1977, 1978, and 1980, and a loss to the Phillies in the World Series in 1980.

Splittorff was known for his direct style in the booth and had, on occassion, rubbed management the wrong way with his criticism of the team and its players. But that’s what makes a good broadcaster.

For his full stats, click here.

(Image of Splittorff’s Topps 1981 card courtesy of vintagecardprices.com. OOTD had this card and it immediately popped into his head when he heard of his illness.)

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