225 Notes

Obit of the Day: Navajo Code Talker
Wilfred Billey joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943 as part of the second wave of Navajo code talkers. Assigned to the 297th Platoon, 1st Batallion, 2nd Division, Mr. Billey and other members would serve in the Pacific theater speaking to each other in their ancient language which was completely unbreakable by the Japanese military.
Mr. Billey and others had to learn nearly 600 code phrases, most of which were Navajo words that disguised english military terms. For example, when speaking about a tank the code talkers would use the Navajo word for “turtle.” A dive bomber was coded as “chicken hawk.” Because all the code talkers spoke directly to each other codebreaking took 20 seconds, instead of 30 minutes or more for codebreaking machines, like the Nazi Enigma.
Note: Although the Navajo code talkers are the best known there were code talkers used during WWII from the Cherokee, Choctaw, and Comanche tribes as well as a short-lived Basque code talker program. These men were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal on November 20, 2013.
After Mr. Billey was discharged in 1946 he went to graduate school and became a teacher and principal in New Mexico, his home state. 
In 2001, the Navajo code talkers were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation’s highest civilian honor given to those ”who have performed an achievement that has an impact on American history and culture that is likely to be recognized as a major achievement in the recipient’s field long after the achievement.” Mr. Billey was asked to create the inscription on the code talker medal which reads, Dine Bizaad Yee Atah Naayee’ Yik’eh Deesdlii, or “The Navajo language was used to defeat the enemy.”
Wilfred Billey died on December 12, 2013 at the age of 90.
Sources: Miami Herald, The Official Site of the Navajo Code Talkers, and Wikipedia
(Image of Mr Wilfred Billey, Navajo code talker, during World War II. The image is copyright of Brian Leddy.)
Other Navajo code talkers featured on Obit of the Day:
Keith Little
Frank Chee Mileto
Joe Morris, Sr.

Obit of the Day: Navajo Code Talker

Wilfred Billey joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943 as part of the second wave of Navajo code talkers. Assigned to the 297th Platoon, 1st Batallion, 2nd Division, Mr. Billey and other members would serve in the Pacific theater speaking to each other in their ancient language which was completely unbreakable by the Japanese military.

Mr. Billey and others had to learn nearly 600 code phrases, most of which were Navajo words that disguised english military terms. For example, when speaking about a tank the code talkers would use the Navajo word for “turtle.” A dive bomber was coded as “chicken hawk.” Because all the code talkers spoke directly to each other codebreaking took 20 seconds, instead of 30 minutes or more for codebreaking machines, like the Nazi Enigma.

Note: Although the Navajo code talkers are the best known there were code talkers used during WWII from the Cherokee, Choctaw, and Comanche tribes as well as a short-lived Basque code talker program. These men were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal on November 20, 2013.

After Mr. Billey was discharged in 1946 he went to graduate school and became a teacher and principal in New Mexico, his home state. 

In 2001, the Navajo code talkers were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation’s highest civilian honor given to those ”who have performed an achievement that has an impact on American history and culture that is likely to be recognized as a major achievement in the recipient’s field long after the achievement.” Mr. Billey was asked to create the inscription on the code talker medal which reads, Dine Bizaad Yee Atah Naayee’ Yik’eh Deesdlii, or “The Navajo language was used to defeat the enemy.”

Wilfred Billey died on December 12, 2013 at the age of 90.

Sources: Miami HeraldThe Official Site of the Navajo Code Talkers, and Wikipedia

(Image of Mr Wilfred Billey, Navajo code talker, during World War II. The image is copyright of Brian Leddy.)

Other Navajo code talkers featured on Obit of the Day:

Keith Little

Frank Chee Mileto

Joe Morris, Sr.

Replies

Likes

  1. inknscroll reblogged this from obitoftheday
  2. tokillthesaudades reblogged this from obitoftheday
  3. notime4yourshit reblogged this from obitoftheday
  4. spindizzily reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  5. meret118 reblogged this from sharkie335
  6. sharkie335 reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  7. janique-marie reblogged this from cultureandseptember
  8. mistervuhsahchee reblogged this from obitoftheday
  9. chestnut-podfic reblogged this from beanarie
  10. teamroquette reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  11. ladykrampus reblogged this from obitoftheday
  12. purpleink9 reblogged this from beanarie
  13. theonewhobroughtgoggles reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  14. jonstewartforpresident reblogged this from beanarie
  15. venusinthenight reblogged this from beanarie
  16. myunicornsensesaretingling reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  17. beanarie reblogged this from everythingsbetterwithbisexuals
  18. everythingsbetterwithbisexuals reblogged this from obitoftheday
  19. clockworkspades reblogged this from cultureandseptember
  20. cultureandseptember reblogged this from kikuhellahonda
  21. kikuhellahonda reblogged this from kkoraki
  22. herpetelogicalspy reblogged this from obitoftheday
  23. kkoraki reblogged this from amiablydebauchedsloth
  24. eglantinebr reblogged this from amiablydebauchedsloth
  25. thesun-shallrise reblogged this from amiablydebauchedsloth
  26. amiablydebauchedsloth reblogged this from obitoftheday
  27. rosalieneedstopee reblogged this from obitoftheday

 

Reblogs