169 Notes

Obit of the Day: Cy Young Award Winner Mike Flanagan

UPDATE: According to the Baltimore Sun, Flanagan committed suicide. He was struggling with financial concerns. A sad story, made sadder.

Mike Flanagan, former major league pitcher, who played a majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles, was found dead outside his home on Wednesday, August 24. Flanagan who won 167 games in his 18-year career, was the 1979 American League Cy Young Award winner finishing 23-9 with a 3.08 ERA and a league-leading five shutouts. Flanagan pitched the Orioles into the 1979 World Series, which they lost to the Pittsburgh “We Are Family” Pirates. He also pitched in the 1983 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies which the Orioles won.

Flanagan spent his post-baseball career with the O’s in the broadcasting booth and, eventually, in the front office, reaching the position of general manager, or executive vice president of baseball operations. He was in that office from 2003-2008.

Flanagan was 59. There are no further details about his death at this time.

(Image of Flanagan’s 1979 Topps card courtesy of bleacherreport.net and copyright Topps.)

Obit of the Day: Cy Young Award Winner Mike Flanagan

UPDATE: According to the Baltimore Sun, Flanagan committed suicide. He was struggling with financial concerns. A sad story, made sadder.

Mike Flanagan, former major league pitcher, who played a majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles, was found dead outside his home on Wednesday, August 24. Flanagan who won 167 games in his 18-year career, was the 1979 American League Cy Young Award winner finishing 23-9 with a 3.08 ERA and a league-leading five shutouts. Flanagan pitched the Orioles into the 1979 World Series, which they lost to the Pittsburgh “We Are Family” Pirates. He also pitched in the 1983 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies which the Orioles won.

Flanagan spent his post-baseball career with the O’s in the broadcasting booth and, eventually, in the front office, reaching the position of general manager, or executive vice president of baseball operations. He was in that office from 2003-2008.

Flanagan was 59. There are no further details about his death at this time.

(Image of Flanagan’s 1979 Topps card courtesy of bleacherreport.net and copyright Topps.)

Replies

Likes

  1. obitoftheday posted this

 

Reblogs